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dc.contributor.authorJordan, Anne
dc.contributor.authorKırcaali İftar, Gönül
dc.contributor.authorDiamond, C. T. Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-29T06:35:01Z
dc.date.available2020-09-29T06:35:01Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationJordan, A., Kırcaali İftar, G. ve Diamond, C. T. P. (1993). Who has a problem, the student of the teacher? Differences in teachers' beliefs about their work with at-risk and integrated exceptional students. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education. 40(1), s. 45-62.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0156655930400104
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12415/6434
dc.description.abstractIn this study, teachers' assumptions and beliefs are explored about the needs of at‐risk and exceptional students, and about their roles and responsibilities in meeting such needs. Teachers appear to hold consistent and coherent belief systems which differ along an ordinal scale. At one end, ‘restorative’ beliefs assume that problems reside largely within the pupil, and therefore the teacher's duty is to refer the pupil for confirmatory assessment as soon as possible. At the other ‘preventive’ end, teachers assume that the environment, including instruction, plays a part in a student's problems. The teacher therefore attempts prereferral interventions, and requests assessment to identify instructional alternatives. This study provides evidence for the validity of the restorative‐preventive construct, reporting the results of both quantitative and qualitative analyses of interviews with 27 regular class elementary teachers. Teachers' ratings on the construct correlated significantly with their self‐ratings of teaching efficacy (Gibson & Dembo, 1984). Teachers with preventive beliefs had higher self‐efficacy scores than those with a restorative profile. Further, teachers with restorative beliefs rated the withdrawal of problem pupils from the classroom as a more desirable resource service than preventive teachers, who preferred in‐class consultative support.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge Taylor and Francis Groupen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1080/0156655930400104en_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen_US
dc.titleWho has a problem, the student or the teacher? Differences in teachers' beliefs about their work with at‐risk and integrated exceptional studentsen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.journalInternational Journal of Disability, Development and Educationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMaltepe Üniversitesi, Eğitim Fakültesien_US
dc.authorid0000-0001-7061-4364en_US
dc.identifier.volume40en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage45en_US
dc.identifier.endpage62en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryUluslararası Hakemli Dergide Makale - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US


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